Poetry Contest


The cover photo on this page represents Shakespeare’s epitaph on his tombstone. (Photo prompt by Marcella Leff, administrator)You may write your own epitaph* (see below). Explanation about your poem is permissible. Photos with your post will be deleted. You may post as many poems as you want but comments are counted per poem only.

Winner will be judged by the most original comments. One person can make many comments but only counts as one comment for winning at the end of the time limit. Your own comments do not count because you cannot judge your own poem. Comments being counted begins on June 23rd, 9:30pm if this event was posted earlier than stated date/time.

Contest will be from June 23 until June 30, 9:30 pm. All members are invited to enter this contest. You can add your friends to join. Challenge them.

Administrators may post examples of poems but are not eligible to win. Administrators can like your poems but their comments do not count.

A new prompt will be posted every week. Winner will be posted on the main group page.

* An epitaph is a short text honoring a deceased person originating from the Greeks. It can be one line or a poetic verse. Strictly speaking, it refers to text that is inscribed on a tombstone or plaque, but it may also be used in a figurative sense. Some epitaphs are specified by the person themselves before their death, while others are chosen by those responsible for the burial.

Even in death, Shakespeare left a verse as an epitaph ( from photo prompt).

Good friend, for Jesus’ sake forbear
To dig the dust enclosed here.
Blessed be the man that spares these stones,
And cursed be he that moves my bones.

It can be humorous. “ It’s over” or “I told you I was sick”.

jesus

 

 

 

 

THE TOMBSTONE READ LIKE THIS

 

YOU SAID I WASN’T ILL

I’M HERE TO SAY YOU’RE WRONG

NOW LET ME REST IN PEACE

ADIOS, GOODBYE, SO LONG.

Written by,

Terry Shepherd

6.24.2015

 

What would you think if you saw these words I wrote on a tombstone?

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