The Hidden Meaning


“We need to take your keys away from you now, today. We are getting tired of asking and you know that you aren’t safe to drive around others. Now give them to us.” Edith looked head on at her kids. She had heard this conversation too many times, and she wasn’t going to change her mind.

She had been driving for over fifty years and she wasn’t about to give her keys up now for them or anyone else. She stuck her lower lip out and posed a pouting face. It didn’t work this time. Her eldest child, yanked them out of her hand, that she had been hiding under her bottom with the keys tucked tightly between her fingers.

Edith didn’t want to live anymore. She began to cry and her kids stared at her and the next words she heard were,”Keep it up and we’ll put you in a home. You know we’re doing this for your own good.” They turned and walked into the kitchen, and molded around the table. It looked like they were deep in conversation. Edith stood up with her walker and walked into her bedroom and laid down.

Edith had had three accidents in the last year. Thankfully, there had been nothing major happen. She ran a mailbox over. She ran a stop sign twice. The adult kids knew it was time for her to relent the keys, but did they handle the topic appropiately?

Edith felt all alone. She lived in the same home that she and her husband bought one year after they were married. They had given birth to three children here and had raised them until they left the nest.

She didn’t understand why they were treating her like this. She had been a good mom. She took good care of her family, so why this? Tears fell from her eyes. She wished with all her heart, that Albert, her husband was still here to help her out of this situation. He would come to her rescue. He had been a wonderful man, husband and father.

The kids didn’t see it like this at all. They saw mom always had some issue going on. They wanted her to be safe in a nursing home where she could get her medications and three meals a day and maybe she could make a friend or two, but mom always fought the idea.

The police had been involved on each accident and there was even one time when adult protective services had been called because a neighbor had seen Edith sitting on the ground and it was almost dark. It turned out that there was no harm. Edith had been enjoying her flowers and was taking in the incense of each one of them, but still the kids had been contacted over this.

They just wanted her safe and why didn’t mom understand that they had lives to live too. They had their work and their families. They were trying to save up money for a vacation or a new set of wheels. She was a mom; why didn’t she get it?

The kids checked in on her and saw that she was asleep so they left quietly through the front door and locked it behind them.They agreed to stop in at mom’s the next evening and they would bring supper with them and share with mom and hopefully mom would be in a better mood.

The next evening came and the kids all met at mom’s at the same time. They knocked but no one answered the door. They looked at each other and whispered, “She must be napping again.”

They unlocked the door and walked in to the kitchen. Placing the food on the table, they looked around and called her name. Walking on to her bedroom, they knocked and when no answer came, they turned the knob.

They walked over and called out to her but she didn’t stir. The one son looked around and then noticed the bottles of pills on her side table. Two of them were empty. The kids looked at each other and the youngest took out her cell and immediately called 911.

When the police and EMS arrived, they tried to revive their mom, but she was gone. The EMT checked the pill bottles the kids handed to him and he placed them in a clear, plastic bag.

He got on his pager and said,” We’re bringing a patient in who is DOA. Looks like a suicide.” The kids dropped their heads onto their mom’s body and began to weep. “Why mom, why…”