Walking The Boardwalk


I am sitting here wishing it were Spring. Wishing I could shove those windows up and let in the fresh air. Hoping I could get out and take a walk.

 

As I sit here I am looking down at my shoes I am wearing. I have taken to wearing shoes this past week. They seem to help my injured feet. Having Diabetic Neuropathy in your feet is a terrible thing. I can’t walk long. I wish that I did not live here after all in Indiana.

 

My kids are here but other than that, my feet hate the cold weather. My feet sense the cold floor and become burning torches. I am such a barefoot or sock and slipper woman who shoes are definitely not in my comfort zone as of yet.

 

When I was gazing at my shoes I went back in time. Back to when I first became divorced from my last husband. Anyone that wanted a divorce as much as I did will understand this next part.

 

The first morning I awoke alone in my own place, I was up and showered and dressed by 5am. I left my home when I wished and went straight to the grocery store. I found so much delight in buying my very own groceries. I loved putting them a way in my very own cupboards.

 

Soon after I was easily adjusted to my living arrangements I discovered there was a boardwalk within walking distance of my home. I was out of shape and the only shoes I had to wear were my nursing shoes.

 

I didn’t want to wear something that was worn and white so I went to a store and bought my very own pair of walking shoes. This was five and a half years ago. I still have them and still wear them. I don’t wear shoes out too quickly.

 

English: River Brant Footbridge Walking in a w...

 

I purchased my first headphones and CD player. My special friend, my camera, and headphones and my new shoes took off for a new chapter in my life. I loved it. It was freedom. A peaceful freedom where I was not intimidated by yelling or hitting.

 

Birds are what I heard. Squirrels darting from branch to branch. Greenery so lush I could get lost in it. At first I walked a mile in total. Within no time at all I moved up to five miles a day. I loved getting off of work and heading for the trail. It was my sanctuary, my heaven, my haven.

 

I kept up this routine for a few months. It was cut short by my Dad finding out he had Cancer. From that moment forth life has been a whirl wind of adventure. I took him to doctor appointments, gave him shots and medications. I listened to him. I kept him company. I part of me died when he did. I have never found that part that died. I think it was buried with him on that painful day.

 

Within a week later I was caring for Al, my brother. As you know this continues even today. I look at my shoes and I can smile. God knew I needed a bit of respite care. He knew that I would be in for the ride of my life. He allowed me to get in touch with myself and taste another side of me.

 

Today life is quiet yet hectic at times. There are days I cry out to my friends when I am  hurting. There are days when I do smile. There are even more days I go back in time and remember the wonderful times my new shoes, camera, and headphones spent hours in the woods walking the Boardwalk.

 

 

 

What Is Your Answer


My sore foot

My sore foot (Photo credit: CCNZ)

She rose to pain when she tried to stand up from her restful sleep. She looked at her foot but saw nothing. She rubbed the bottom of her foot and felt the pain. When she bent her toes, she could feel the bone on the bottom move, and that was where the pain radiated.

She wanted to climb back into bed. She didn’t want to be forced to walk on it, but she knew she had things that she needed to do. People were depending on her, and sickness and not feeling well were excluded for good reasons to pass the time away lying down.

She tried standing on it again, and realized she could move, but the pain  could be seen in her facial features with each step. Through out the day, people came in and out of her life, no one paying any attention to the limping woman.

Sally was a waitress, and a darn good one, but today, she wanted someone to wait on her. Sally had too much pride to bring up the topic of her pain to the customers, so she kept quiet. During her shift, she managed to do her job, but on her break she went to the back room of the building and sat on a box and pulled off her shoe and sock. The bottom of her foot was cherry red, and the burning felt like someone had lit a match to her foot.

Sally knew where she had gone wrong, but this was after the fact, and there was nothing to do now but wait for the pain to diminish. She had went shopping the evening before, and instead of wearing her shoes and socks, she wore flip-flops. Not enough support for diabetic feet, but she wanted her feet to be free. It was hot and humid, and she chose not to do the right thing.

Right after lunch, there was to be a woman who came into work to relieve her, but this didn’t happen, as her boss told her the woman had called off due to illness. Sally had to stay. She went into the bathroom and took her shoe and sock off again, and cried out to no one listening. She was telling the pain to please leave. She left it open to the air for a few minutes, then got herself back a presentable look and went back to work.

Finally, it was time to clock out. She had done it, she had finished her job. She punched out and walked the two blocks home. When she got home, family was in the yard swimming, and I could hear the kids laughing. They all seemed to be having a good time. Sally waved to them as she went inside her house. She ran herself a bath and soaked her tired and achy body. Her feet seemed to be telling her thank you as some of the pain left.

She had finished her bath, and put on her house robe and was sitting in her favorite recliner, when the grandchildren came running in the door, soaking wet, and started to sit down on the furniture. Sally told them to go back outside and dry off before coming in, and the kids listened, giving her more time to relax.

About a  half an hour went by and Sally had just dozed off, and the door flung open and they all entered. They were hungry, they wanted to know what was for supper. All plopped down in front of the TV and the discussion about food continued.

Sally told them about her sore foot and what a busy day she had at work, and that she wasn’t planning on having anything more than toast and coffee for herself for supper. This hint went over their heads. The talk continued, and eventually Sally knew she had to get up and prepare supper. As she stood up from her recliner, she mumbled under her breath, inconsiderate people, always thinking of themselves. The story ended seeing Sally limping out into the kitchen to yet prepare another meal.

 

What should have happened in this story?

1. Sally should have called off work?

2. Sally should have told the truth to the boss?

3. The family should have been considerate and cooked or ordered take-out?

4. Sally should have told the family off and sent them out the door?

5. Sally should have stayed in bed.

 

Which one of these answers would you choose, and explain why.